Have Pneumonia or Have a Pneumonia. Which Is Correct?

We say "have pneumonia" (without "a"). When talking about diseases, "a" is generally unnecessary.

We say "have pneumonia" (without "a").

My doctor thinks that I might have pneumonia.

My doctor thinks that I might have a pneumonia.

When talking about diseases, "a" is generally unnecessary.

When a person has pneumonia, the alveoli are filled with pus and fluid.

It's normal to feel tired for a while after having pneumonia.

Follow the same practice with the expressions "diagnose pneumonia", "cause pneumonia", or "prevent pneumonia".

Bacteria and viruses can cause pneumonia.

You can help prevent pneumonia by practicing a healthy lifestyle and avoid sick people.

But you can use the possessive pronouns (my, your, his, her, our, your, their) before "pneumonia".

If your pneumonia is severe, you may have trouble breathing in enough oxygen.

When using the word pneumonia as an adjective, it can be preceded by the articles a/an according to the usual rules.

A pneumonia patient was admitted to the hospital yesterday.

This is a partial list of names of diseases and conditions that do not take a/an:

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