Have Diabetes or Have a Diabetes. Which Is Correct?

We say "have diabetes" (not "have a diabetes"). If you're talking about diseases, the indefinite article "a" is usually unnecessary.

We say "have diabetes" (not "have a diabetes"). If you're talking about diseases, the indefinite article "a" is usually unnecessary.

The longer you have diabetes, the higher the risk of complications.

The longer you have a diabetes, the higher the risk of complications.

More examples:

Pre-diabetes is a specific stage between not having diabetes and having type 2 diabetes.

If you have type 2 diabetes, it's important to follow a healthy diet pattern and avoid sugary foods.

Follow the same strategy with the expressions "treat diabetes", "develop diabetes", "cause diabetes", "prevent diabetes", etc.

Your doctor may use a second test to diagnose diabetes.

Exercise and diet can help prevent and treat diabetes.

We can use, however, a possessive pronoun (my, your, his, her, our, your, their) before "diabetes".

There are a number of treatments available to help you treat your diabetes.

When using this word as an adjective, use the article a/an or another determiner according to the usual rules.

Robert is a diabetes patient who was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at the age of 41.

A diabetes diagnosis means that you will have to start monitoring your blood glucose levels.

A partial list of diseases and conditions that do not take the article "a":

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