Have Appendicitis or Have an Appendicitis. Which Is Correct?

We say "have appendicitis". Remember, when you talk about diseases, the article "a" is not necessary.

We say "have appendicitis". Remember, when you talk about diseases, the article "a" is not necessary.

Do you have appendicitis?

More examples:

What are the risks of having appendicitis?

The imaging test showed that my appendix was inflamed, and I had appendicitis.

Follow the same convention with the expressions "treat appendicitis", "cause appendicitis", "prevent appendicitis", "diagnose appendicitis", etc.

The doctor diagnosed appendicitis and she was operated on.

There's no proven way to prevent appendicitis.

Appendectomy is the surgery used to treat appendicitis.

However, you can use a possessive pronoun (my, your, his, her, etc.) before "appendicitis".

Your doctor may treat your appendicitis with antibiotics.

When using "appendicitis" as an adjective, to describe a countable noun, add the article a/an or another determiner (this, that, my, your, etc.) according to the usual rules.

Did you have an appendicitis attack?

Your doctor may prescribe medication to help control your appendicitis symptoms.

A partial list of diseases and illnesses that do not take a/an:

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