Have Parkinson's or Have a Parkinson's. Which Is Correct?

We say "have Parkinson's" or "have Parkinson's disease". When you speak about diseases or conditions, the article "a" is generally unnecessary.

We say "have Parkinson's" or "have Parkinson's disease" (without the indefinite article "a").

My 45-year-old husband has Parkinson’s disease.

My 45-year-old husband has a Parkinson’s disease.

When you speak about diseases or conditions, the article "a" is generally unnecessary.

Linda lives with her faher, who has Parkinson's.

Having Parkinson's disease doesn't necessarily mean that you have to stop driving.

Follow the same strategy with the expressions "diagnose Parkinson's disease", "treat Parkinson's", "cause Parkinson's", "prevent Parkinson's disease", etc.

Are there any scientifically backed ways to prevent Parkinson’s disease?

Doctors frequently diagnose Parkinson’s disease by performing a neurological examination.

However, "Parkinson's" can also be an adjective. In this case, it can be preceded by the articles a/an or another determiner.

A Parkinson’s disease diagnosis requires that you have a specific symptom.

A partial list of diseases and conditions that do not take a/an can be found below:

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