Have a Cough or Have Cough. Which Is Correct?

We say "have a cough". Since "cough" is a countable noun, it takes the article "a".

We say "have a cough". Since "cough" is a countable noun, it takes the article "a".

My brother has a cough.

My brother has cough.

Remember, we use a/an with singular countable nouns.

She has a nasty cough.

And most names of symptoms require a/an.

The baby has a cough, so his parents are taking him to the doctor.

Follow the same rule with the expressions "cause a cough", "get a cough", "treat a cough", etc.

Anyone can get a cough.

How can you treat a cough?

In everyday English, we often use a possessive pronoun (my, your, his, her, etc.) before "cough".

What's causing her cough?

You can also use a determiner (any, some, these, several, etc.) to identify or quantify a group of coughs.

Some coughs produce mucus while others are dry.

However, when using the plural form (coughs) in a general sense, omit the determiner.

Coughs can be uncomfortable and annoying.

They are prone to get coughs in winter.

A partial list of common symptoms that also take the article a/an:

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