Have a Stomachache or Have Stomachache. Which is Correct?

In American English, stomachache is a countable noun, which always takes a determiner (the, a, this, my, etc.) when it is singular.

In American English, stomachache is a countable noun, which always takes a determiner (the, a, this, my, etc.) when it's singular.

My kids have a stomachache.

Follow the same practice with other related expressions, such as “give a stomachache”, “get a stomachache”, “cause a stomachache”, “experience a stomachache”, etc.

Eating too much spicy food will give you a stomachache.

In British English, native speakers sometimes drop the article, so you can say:

I have stomachache.

I have a stomachache.

1. How to Use ‘Stomachache’ in American English

If you have a stomachache, you have a continuous pain in your stomach.

Olivia got a stomachache from eating too much last night.

The word stomachache is countable in American English.

I had several stomachaches last month.

When a countable noun is singular, it is usually preceded by a determiner, like “the”, “a”, “my”, “that”, etc.

Everyone has had a stomachache at some point.

Eating healthy food makes my stomachache go away.

Follow the same strategy with other related expressions, such as “get a stomachache”, “give a stomachache”, “complain of a stomachache”, “experience a stomachache”, etc.

Eating too much candy will give you a stomachache.

The girl came into the doctor’s office yesterday complaining of a stomachache.

Use also a determiner (the, some, many, several, etc.) to mention a specific group or collection of stomachaches.

Be aware that some stomachaches should not be ignored.

But omit it when talking about stomachaches in general.

Stomachaches are a common complaint among kids.

Bellyache is an informal synonym of this word.

I ate too much candy and got a bellyache.

A partial list of symptom names that also require an article or another determiner can be found below:

2. Stomachache in British English

In British English, the noun “stomachache” (or “stomach ache”) is both countable and uncountable; thus, you can drop the article.

I’ve got stomachache.

If you have stomach ache, avoid drinking alcohol and difficult-to-digest foods.

The British also tend to write it with two words (stomach ache) more frequently.

I've got bad stomach ache.

The synonym tummy ache can be used in very casual situations. Tummy is an informal word used by children and parents to refer to the stomach or belly.

Nancy has been eating too many cakes; she is getting tummy ache and don’t want to go to school.

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