Is Contents a Plural Noun?

"Contents" is a plural noun. We commonly use this word to talk about the things that are inside a container or are written in a book, email, etc.

"Contents" is a plural noun. We commonly use this word to talk about the things that are inside a container (bag, box, briefcase, drawer, etc.) or the things that are written in a book, email, article, etc.

What are the contents of your box?

The contents of the book are well organized.

"Contents" or "table of contents" can also refer to a page in a book where you can find a list of chapters.

The contents are on page 5.

Remember, we always use a plural pronoun (those, these, them, etc.) with plural nouns. They also require a verb in the plural, so we say "contents are" (not "contents is").

The contents of the book are based on lectures given by the author.

The contents of the book is based on lectures given by the author.

Be aware that you cannot use the indefinite article "a" before "contents".

What's the difference between "content" and "contents"? We use "content" to discuss the story or ideas of a speech, piece of writing, etc. or to mention the amount of a substance that something contains.

The content of the speech was understood by the audience.

The sugar content of chocolate bars may be higher than expected.

A book, for example, has contents (chapters, subchapters, sections, etc.); the content of a book, by contrast, is the story it tells.

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