How to Use 'In order that'

"In order that" is a subordinating conjunction. It's always followed by a subject and a verb.

"In order that" is a subordinating conjunction. It's always followed by a subject and a verb (e.g., "in order that it can be concluded"). We use this compound conjunction to express purpose.

We need to strengthen our health information system in order that doctors and patients can make better decisions.

You can start a sentence with "in order that"; that is, "in order that" can be used at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence.

In the front position, we need a comma after the introductory clause.

In order that doctors and patients can make better decisions, we need to strengthen our health information system.

You can use "so that" instead of "in order that". Both are subordinating conjunctions that have the same meaning and are used in the same way. "In order that", however, is more formal and less frequent than "so that".

The company issued bonds to investors (so that/in order that) it could benefit from lower interest rates.

Note that "in order that" and "so that" are usually followed by modal verbs, such as "can", "could", "will", "should", "would", etc.

Share this article: Link copied to clipboard!

You might also like...

'In order to' vs. 'In order that'. What's the Difference?

'So that' vs. 'So'. What's the Difference?

Is 'In order that' Formal?