Can You Start a Sentence with 'In order that'?

You can use "in order that" at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence.

It's correct to start a sentence with "in order that" to express purpose. For example:

In order that the most popular campaigns rise to the most prominent positions, participants can be voted up or down by peers.

"In order that" is a subordinating conjunction and can be used at the beginning of a sentence. There are a few points, however, to note here:

  1. Commas. When using "in order that" at the beginning of a sentence, add a comma after the subordinate clause that follows.

    In order that patients get full benefit of the new treatment, doctors must collaborate.

    In order that patients get full benefit of the new treatment doctors must collaborate.

  2. Emphasis. While this construction can be used for emphasis, overusing it can be problematic.

    In order that she could escape punishment, Olivia told a lie. (It shows emphasis.)

    Olivia told a lie in order that she could escape punishment. (a more neutral version)

"In order that" and "so that" are synonyms. Both conjunctions have the same meaning and can be used in the same way. Nevertheless, "so that" is slightly less formal and much more common than "in order that".

So that my wife could take an executive job, we moved to Seattle.

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