'Stand in Line' or 'Stand in the Line'

We commonly say "stand in line" (without the article "the") when talking about a row of people or things.

We commonly say "stand in line" (without the article "the") when talking about a row of people or things.

We had to stand in line for two hours.

Similarly, we say "be in line" or "wait in line".

Are you in line?

If somebody goes in front of other people who are waiting in line, you can use the phrase "cut in line" (not "cut in the line").

She cut in line in front of us.

We usually omit the article in these sentences to emphasize the action or verb rather than the noun. However, you can use the articles (a, the) or other determiners (this, that, those, etc.) to identify or quantify the noun in situations like these:

The line is around the corner.

It's a long/short line.

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