How to Use 'With the Intention of'

"With the intention of" is a compound preposition that has a gerund as its object. We use it to express purpose.

"With the intention of" is a compound preposition that has a gerund as its object. We use it to express purpose.

The manager is improving his marketing operations with the intention of gaining additional market share.

You can start a sentence with this preposition. In this situation, add a comma after the introductory phrase.

With the intention of gaining additional market share, the manager is improving his marketing operations.

With the intention of gaining additional market share the manager is improving his marketing operations.

"With the intention of" is mainly used in written English, formal, and semiformal contexts.

They reduced the price with the intention of making the product more affordable.

In colloquial English language, we normally use "to + infinitive" instead.

My kid went to the park to play with his friends.

My kid went to the park with the intention of playing with his friends.

You can also use this construction to make a negative statement.

She left home at 8 a.m. with the intention of not returning until midnight.

And remember, this prepositional phrase is followed by a gerund, and not an infinitive.

No one starts a business with the intention of failing.

No one starts a business with the intention of fail.

The following compound prepositions are synonyms of "with the intention of". All of them have the same meaning and are used in the same way.

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