How to Use 'In order to'

You can use "in order to" at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence. Both constructions are correct and often interchangeable.

"In order to" is a compound preposition that has an infinitive as its object. It is used to express purpose (e.g., "in order to achieve") or to mean "so that it is possible to" (e.g., "eat in order to live").

I need to save money in order to buy a new car.

I need to save money in order to buying a new car.

You can start a sentence with "in order to"; that is, you can use this preposition at the beginning or in the middle of a sentence. Both constructions are correct and often interchangeable.

In order to travel abroad, she must have a valid passport.

She must have a valid passport in order to travel abroad.

Note that when starting a sentence with "in order to", you need a comma after the introductory phrase.

In order to achieve your goal, take the first step and set a deadline.

In order to achieve your goal take the first step and set a deadline.

We'll add here that you can use the construction "in order (for someone/something) to do/be/have... something"

In order for the company to achieve sustainable growth, we should create a customer loyalty program.

In order for the body to function properly, it needs energy and cohesiveness between the muscles and joints.

The negative form of "in order to" is "in order not to".

You need to analyze audience preferences in order not to waste money and time.

You can almost always replace "in order to" by "to".

In order to learn a language on your own, start with the basics and be consistent.

To learn a language on your own, start with the basics and be consistent.

What's the difference between "in order to" and "to"? "In order to" is more formal and more frequently used in writing.

In order to avoid excessive exhaust pollution from your vehicle, change regularly its air filters.

In everyday English, by contrast, "to" is much more common.

We went to the mall to buy a few gifts.

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