Is It 'Congratulate Someone' or 'Congratulations to Someone'?

Both expressions are correct. You can congratulate someone or offer/send congratulations to someone.

Both expressions are correct. You can congratulate someone or offer/send congratulations to someone.

The boss of the oil company offered congratulations to his employees.

The teacher congratulated me warmly on my exam results.

However, "congratulations to someone" may sound wordy or too formal in some situations.

We offered our congratulations to Olivia on her graduation.

"Congratulate someone", by contrast, sounds more natural and fluent.

We congratulated Olivia on her graduation.

When offering congratulations to a corporation, company, non-governmental organization, etc., we usually say "congratulations to".

We sent our congratulations to the insurance company.

The verb "congratulate" can also be used with reflexive pronouns; that is, you can "congratulate yourself".

You should congratulate yourself on your performance.

Do you congratulate someone "on" or "for" something? Use "on" to "congratulate someone on something"; however, you can "congratulate someone for doing something".

I congratulated Robert on his new job.

I congratulated Robert for getting a new job.

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