Is 'So that' a Conjunction?

"So that" is a subordinating conjunction. It introduces a dependent clause and joins it to a main clause.

"So that" is a subordinating conjunction. It introduces a dependent clause and joins it to a main clause.

Peter is learning German so that he can live in Germany.

Peter is learning German so that live in Germany.

We use this conjunction to express purpose or why something happens. In other words, "so that" introduces an adverbial clause, which plays the role of an adverb.

They moved out early so that the house could be cleaned.

It's correct to start a sentence with "so that". When using it in the front position, add a comma after the introductory phrase.

So that the house could be cleaned, they moved out early.

So that the house could be cleaned they moved out early.

A shortened and more informal version of "so that" is simply "so". For example, you can say:

Sarah takes Spanish classes so that she can speak more confidently.

Or use "so" by itself (informal colloquial English):

Sarah takes Spanish classes so she can speak more confidently.

Note that we usually use a modal verb after "so that", typically "can", "could", "will", or "would".

They’re dropping the price of the book so that more people will be able to afford it.

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